Parc des Rapides

I didn’t realize how much I needed to get out of the house until… I got out of the house. Taking a little drive to a local Montreal park was almost as exciting as taking a road trip out of town. We found this beautiful oasis at Parc des Rapides in Lasalle, with red winged blackbirds, ducks and families of geese and goslings. Nothing out of the ordinary really, but it was a different view and I was happy to spend a few hours looking out at the water. I was really hoping it sketch the rapids but that area was blocked off, probably because the paths are too narrow to safely keep pedestrians six feet apart. I guess that will be the norm for this summer. Sketched in an Etchr sketchbook under the shade of a willow tree.

Original source: https://shariblaukopf.com/2020/05/27/parc-des-rapides/

Robbie Trevino

Robbie Trevino is a freelance concept designer and illustrator based in Seattle, WA, specializing in surreal and sci-fi design and illustration. Over the years he has created work for a number of clients including: Valve, Wizards of the Coast, Netflix, West Studio, Tool Band, Crunchyroll, Amazon Game Studios, XBOX, 3dtotal, Mondo, TeccoToys, Unknown Worlds and many more.

Link: Portfolio | Twitter | Instagram

All images © Robbie Trevino or their respective copyright holder.

The post Robbie Trevino appeared first on Concept Art World.

Original source: http://conceptartworld.com/artists/robbie-trevino/

Yellow Roses

For Mother’s Day, I was remembered by my grown children with 2 arrangements, one of Pink and one of Yellow roses. Naturally I had to stop what I was planning on doing to paint them. With this Pandemic, planning ahead is not really going to help the situation much, but I have noticed that if you are open to changing course, it usually works out better…or at least better than hoped. The roses, although lovely, were all about the same size, so it was wise to adapt further and paint some of them smaller to help the composition. Again, our eyes delight is variety so adapt. Which reminds me of what I learned long ago while raising said children, have courage and trust yourself when things don’t go as planned. And speaking of planned, I have been treating a visit to the grocery store like a military maneuver, buying 2 weeks worth of groceries and then planning on eating them according to how soon they will expire. Usually at the end of 2 weeks I have milk and eggs about to go bad, SO, I remembered how much my kids liked Egg Custard! Perfect Nursery food but also very comforting for people in Quarantine!
Heat 4 cups of milk. Meanwhile beat 4 eggs in a bowl and add a pinch of salt, half a cup sugar, and splash of vanilla. While beating, SLOWLY add hot milk to egg mixture and then pour everything into a baking dish and sprinkle with nutmeg. Set this in a larger pan in the oven and pour boiling water from your tea kettle into the larger pan for a hot water bath. Bake on 350 for about 30 to 45 minutes. No need to wait until after dinner… It’s great for breakfast!

Original source: http://parispruden.com/blog/156730/yellow-roses

Pond Reflections

We’ve Got to get Out of Here! I am also going crazy! This is no time to publicly melt-down, so I will do what all the adults in my life are doing and find ways to escape. Drinking in excess is an unattractive and often dangerous option as well as gluttony, but I confess to having tried both. However; the self loathing, not to mention the inevitable painful consequences, are not worth it. So, Now What? Let’s find ways to engage our mind so completely that we forget where we are. Some people are playing Bridge on line, others Chess. One friend has a stirring Zoom game of Monopoly with her grandchildren in California. Many have taken up puzzles, and then there is baking bread…but that often leads to gluttony,( I fear). My daughter has lost a dress size from stepping up her time on her Peloton, and I see all my neighbors walking in the Hood, so that’s good. However; since this is an Art Blog, I have another idea. How about you join me next Wednesday, (tomorrow morning) at the Arboretum and try your hand at painting, or drawing plein air? Classes, for the moment, are free, but bring a mask if you want my help. We are all 6 feet apart and outside, so pretty sure we are safe. Email me here for directions. What have you got to lose?

Original source: http://parispruden.com/blog/156731/pond-reflections

Meet the Others: Karli Henneman

The Game Changers. The Rule Breakers. The Innovators. Discover some of the fantastic emerging talent showcasing their work at The Other Art Fair.

Karli Henneman is a Los Angeles based artist whose serene exploration of light and shadow investigates the ambiguous markings of urban spaces. Her hard-edge painting technique offers a meditative perceptual experience through the intricate interplay of simple geometric forms. Using a neutral palette with subtle variations of color and tonal differences, she creates works of both equal opposition and volume.

Questioning our modern world through methodical exhibits of shades of gray. The distinct clean lines and tonal shifts of Karli’s work imbue a spark of coaction between the formal structures of her subject matter; brutalist form meeting elegant shadow. Her language of minimalist elements on vertically orientated linen canvases unify her paintings with both balance and a keen sense of craft. 


Q&A with the Artist

Tell us about who you are and what you do. What is your background?

I am a Los Angeles based painter investigating the ambiguous markings of architectural spaces. I received my BFA from Parsons; The New School for Design (NYC), and studied Art Therapy at NYU.

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

Minimalism, brutalism form meeting elegant shadow, and subdue palette variations.

How did you first get interested in your medium and what draws you to it specifically?

I initially was inspired to create this body of work by examining how light moves through my home. I discovered dynamic shadows and rays of light cast through my windows and doors; along with captivating formations of geometric shapes where the walls met the ceiling.

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Back from the framer ✅ #karliart #painting #karliarte’

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How has your style and practice changed over the years?

While living in New York City I created very colorful, large scale, and labor intensive mixed media pieces. After moving to Los Angeles (in 2018), and becoming a mother; the time I had available to create my art was much more limited. When I decided to start painting again, I pulled inspiration from what surrounded me. I also wanted to create art that was serene, meditative, and easy to live with.

Can you walk us through your process? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it’s finished?

I start by taking high contrast photos of structural forms, beams of light, and shadows on the walls (since light and shadow are in constant fluctuation throughout the day). Working from photographs helps me solidify the moment. I then tape-off the edges of the canvas. I enjoy working with paint in a “grounded” space made by the clean lines of the tape. I only use three paint colors; white, black, and sienna. The limited amount of colors challenges me to create a dynamic environment in my work with subtle tonal shifts. Since I have a young son, the time available for me to create revolves around his schedule. If I’m luckily, I can finish a small piece in day. Most times the canvas needs to be revisited several times throughout the week.

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#karliart #karliarte’ #new_and_abstract

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What series or project are you working on next?

Studies on watercolor paper

What is the best advice given to you as an artist?

If it feels good…keep doing it.

Shop artwork by Karli and other trailblazing artists at The Other Art Fair’s Online Studios.

Introducing The Other Art Fair Online Studios, a new online platform offering art lovers around the world access to over 800 Fair artists. The Online Studios will keep our community feeling inspired, engaged, and continue to spread joy through art.

Original source: https://canvas.saatchiart.com/the-other-art-fair/meet-the-others-karli-henneman

Meet the Others: Harry Chandler

The Game Changers. The Rule Breakers. The Innovators. Discover some of the fantastic emerging talent showcasing their work at The Other Art Fair.

Harry Chandler is an accomplished mid-career multi-media artist, painter, photographer, sculptor and digital artist, based in downtown Los Angeles. His recent work focuses on icons and imagery of California. He has had three solo museum shows and multiple gallery shows.

Harry studied art at Phillips Academy Andover and Stanford University. He also attended the UCLA Graduate School of Motion Pictures and Television.


Q&A with the Artist

Tell us about who you are and what you do. What is your background?

I am a mid-career artist from Los Angeles, working in a variety of media on subject matter related to California themes. I graduated from Stanford University and attended UCLA Graduate School of Film and Television.  Prior to my career as an artist, I worked as a television executive (Spotlight, Showtime, CBS, Hearst Entertainment) and as an independent film producer, producing eight television films. After leaving the entertainment business, I was an executive in new business development for the Los Angeles Times and the EVP in a technology startup that invented paid internet search, Overture (now Yahoo Search Services).

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

My recent work focuses on series in different media, exploring various themes in my exploration of iconic California imagery. From beaches, to sun bathers, to Pacific Ocean, to freeways, the Hollywood sign and more.

How did you first get interested in your medium and what draws you to it specifically?

I work in painting, sculpture, photography and video. One of my newest series, Pacific Shimmers, start with photographs printed on aluminum that I paint over.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

I am constantly changing mediums and styles. Four years ago, I moved into a big downtown L.A. studio that allowed me to work on multiple projects simultaneously, and fabricate pieces.

Can you walk us through your process? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it’s finished?

The process differs so much on each series.

What series or project are you working on next?

I just finished 10 painted sculptures called Totem Bathers https://harrychandler.com/totem-bathers.  Next up will be a large piece with a LED laser-cut Hollywoodland sign.

What is the best advice given to you as an artist?

Be fearless. Trust your own instincts.

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Social distancing with my Totem Bathers sculptures! #artistatwork #artlover #fineartist #colorinspiration #modernpainting #instaartpop #artpainting #contemporaryartcurator #artfair #artgallery #artmagazine #artbasel #artadvisor #artcurator #contemporaryartist #contemporaryartcollector #artlover #artistatwork #artfair #artcollectors #artgallery #artmagazine #artbasel #artadvisor #artgalleries #fineart #abstractexpressionism #artistininstagram #artsy #art_spotlight

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Shop artwork by Harry and other trailblazing artists at The Other Art Fair’s Online Studios.

Introducing The Other Art Fair Online Studios, a new online platform offering art lovers around the world access to over 800 Fair artists. The Online Studios will keep our community feeling inspired, engaged, and continue to spread joy through art.

Original source: https://canvas.saatchiart.com/the-other-art-fair/meet-the-others-harry-chandler

Meet the Others: Rapheal Crump

The Game Changers. The Rule Breakers. The Innovators. Discover some of the fantastic emerging talent showcasing their work at The Other Art Fair.

Rapheal Crump is a painter originally from NYC and now working full-time in his Dallas, TX studio. He has a love for sneakers and admits he has collected too many to count.

Rapheal often does paintings of shoes hanging in urban scenarios or vividly colored cityscape themed imagery. Through his work, he tells a relatable story of life in the concrete jungle.


Q&A with the Artist

Tell us about who you are and what you do. What is your background?

My name is Rapheal (e before the a) Crump, an artist originally from NYC, now  I live and work out of my studio in Dallas Texas. I come from a creative family that highly valued education. They have always supported and pushed me to follow my dreams in visual arts. We weren’t the wealthiest of families and I had to find ways to pay for the things I wanted. I found out at an early age that people would pay to have my artwork. From middle to high school, I would draw people’s names in graffiti style for their lunch money and I took it and reinvested it back into supplies for my art. To pay my way through college, I opened up a custom clothing store with a partner, which successfully lasted 5 years until I graduated. After graduating from The School of Visual Arts in 2007, I landed a great job heading the art and design department for a major media outlet until 2017. That was the job that moved me from NYC to Dallas, and the shift is what allowed me to really focus on my craft and focus on my passion. At a new year’s party in January of 2017, I decided to take on my passion for painting as a full-time artist and with the support of my family, friends, and the Dallas art community, have been blessed to successfully do so. I have to say, It’s been a rollercoaster of a journey!

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

A majority of my work consists of urban imagery which comes from the experiences I had growing up in New York. you will notice that I rarely place people in my work, I want to give attention to the beauty in the everyday objects that are regularly overlooked. I am also am a very big sneaker fanatic and incorporate my love for shoes into some of my work. I show high-end footwear that has been tossed over powerlines, a phenomenon that has global recognition but few know the reason for the act.

How did you first get interested in your medium and what draws you to it specifically?

Aerosol and acrylic on canvas was my go-to, which allowed me to paint fast, execute details easily, and have quick drying times. In 2019 I was convinced to make the jump over to oil paints by another artist that I look up to. The shift has opened up a new realm of creativity, helping me offer better value, visual quality, and technique when telling my story on my canvas. The change in medium has assisted in the completion of my paintings to a substantial degree.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

My style and practice have developed as I have taken my work more seriously when becoming a full-time artist. I have fine-tuned my focus, storytelling, color pallet, and style just from experimenting on new things, trying new techniques, messing up and failing, and paying attention to how people react to in my work. I have also become more particular about where I show my work and how it is displayed. Those decisions have made a big difference in the advancement of my career, just treating it as anyone would a normal job. I wake up early, answer emails, advertise, work from certain hours of the day, plan ahead, and do my best to try to offer the best business practices to my patrons that support my work.

Can you walk us through your process? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it’s finished?

I worked in the graphic media field for almost 11 years which you can observe, adds a strong design element to my work.  I would say the longest process in my work, is coming up with the composition before I start a painting. Merging the stories from my past with subject matter, finding the right imagery, composition, color palette, and then putting it all into one visual. Depending on my subject, size, and how I feel about the work, my paintings can take a day or even up to a year to complete. I kind of get into the zone while working, I pre-mix my colors, have my dachshund puppies laying by my feet, music plays in the background and just go at it. Painting puts me in a zen-like feel almost meditative and It’s easy to go for hours at a time. In order to take a break from each canvas, I work on multiple pieces at once. This is a technique that allows me to have fresh eyes, thoughts, and complete multiple canvases at an optimum rate. Once I feel that a painting flows, I’ll stop, sign my name, photograph it, and come back to observe it the next day.

What series or project are you working on next?

I originally started my paintings as a series called “Mystery of the Flying Kicks”. It is a tribute to the sneaker culture with high end, very expensive shoes that are collected, sold, and traded like the stock market. I would paint them like they were tossed over powerlines in the streets. I have recently started small to medium-sized city-themed paintings that show a vibrant, energetic environment where you would see the shoes that hang on power lines. Now that I have a larger studio space, I started work on larger canvases. I have been incorporating all the objects I focused on with my smaller paintings, and produce city scenes which I’m excited to show you soon!

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I grew up experiencing true symbols of hip hop and street culture. As a child I was surrounded by blackbooks full of graffiti, kelly green suede Pumas, giant Panasonic boom boxes called "ghetto blasters", Krylon spray paint cans, and watched my father fix cassette tapes that he had stashed in sneaker boxes. The memories! . Blast Era 24" x 30" Oil on Canvas . #oilpainting #puma #ghettoblaster #boombox #cassettetapes #hiphop #streetculture #borninthe80s #krylon #texturedpainting #artiststudio #contemporaryart #interiordecor #newyorker #ghettoblaster

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What is the best advice given to you as an artist?

If you really love your art, don’t ever give up or stop creating. As an artist, it takes time to develop a voice and find the people that love your story. You have to ask questions, educate yourself about the community you want to be part of, go to the shows, get your work in front of as many people as possible using social media, local art shows, advertising, and networking. The most important word of advice is to stay true to what you love, people will appreciate and love you for it in the long run. Put in the work and do what you love!

Shop artwork by Rapheal and other trailblazing artists at The Other Art Fair’s Online Studios.

Introducing The Other Art Fair Online Studios, a new online platform offering art lovers around the world access to over 800 Fair artists. The Online Studios will keep our community feeling inspired, engaged, and continue to spread joy through art.

Original source: https://canvas.saatchiart.com/the-other-art-fair/meet-the-others-rapheal-crump

Meet the Others: Jaime Gray

The Game Changers. The Rule Breakers. The Innovators. Discover some of the fantastic emerging talent showcasing their work at The Other Art Fair.

Originally from the American West, Jamie Gray is currently established in Kansas City, Missouri. The artist has exhibited and sold artworks in both the United Kingdom and United States. Academic degrees in graphic design deeply underpin her visual language, which is often inspired by a nascent interest in the sciences – from mycology to astronomy.

Her work had been described as both “geometric and primordial” and explores the juxtaposition of simple motifs with layered textures, as well as the integration of traditional craft-based techniques – hand-marbling, encaustic wax, and gold leaf gilding – in the making of contemporary artworks.


Q&A with the Artist

Tell us about who you are and what you do.  What is your background?

I’ve pursued many professional paths in my life, including design, teaching, and retail, but time and again I always circle back to art. Finally, I’m fortunate (and brave enough) to embrace a life as a full-time artist based in Kansas City. Primarily a painter, within the past decade I’ve become more cross-disciplinary and include collage, watercolor, sculpture, and jewelry design in my practice. I have two degrees in graphic design and this foundation forms an important part of my identity as an artist, as well as guides my working methodology, conceptual approach, and abstract aesthetic. 

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

It is said that all life on earth is created from the matter of long-dead stars. Through my art, I strive to make meditative moments that represent the creative forces behind our universe and to draw a visual comparison between that which is often too familiar and too vast to see. The shapes and patterns I see in nature and the universe — mushrooms, mountains, rocks, clouds, sea life, plants, and the cosmos — provide me with a constant source of inspiration and the motivation to reveal their connectivity through reoccurring geometric motifs.

How did you first get interested in your medium and what draws you to it specifically?

An artist my whole life, I find abstract painting the most constant and accessible. I’m also an admirer of traditional hand-crafts and am keen on integrating aspects of what may seem contrary in the making of contemporary artwork. I enjoy a willingness to explore and embrace the self-taught skills of marbling, gold leaf gilding, encaustic wax, and woodworking in my abstract compositions.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

Rather than what has changed, I’m particularly interested in identifying the conceptual and formal threads running through work I made 5, 10, 20 years ago, even as my technique, materials (and locations) have varied. Finding continuity is a big part of my artistic point of view and offers me evidence of deep investigation throughout my artist’s journey.

Can you walk us through your process? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it’s finished?

My studio is always filled with multiple projects in various stages. My process includes experimentation, iteration, dead ends, reinvention, and lots of valuable contemplative pauses between. Logistically, most work requires several sequential steps that demand patience and time. For example, I hand marble my own materials, which must be done before I can select, cut, or compose. I often finish a piece with a touch of gold leaf to reference the star stuff that permeates all life. 

What series or project are you working on next?

I will keep adding to my long term body of work, ‘Cosmic Botany’, as well as am developing a new series addressing my passion for collecting and arranging objects as a means of personal storytelling. I am excited to develop this narrative-based symbology across different mediums including encaustic collage on wood, acrylic on canvas, and small sculptural and kinetic works.

What is the best advice given to you as an artist?

I think most artists benefit from participating in a community of active working artists. After many years of working from a home studio, I currently rent a studio at the Kansas City Artists Coalition and have found many advantages to working in a shared space, as well as through having ongoing critiques of mid-process work with other creatives. 

Shop artwork by Jamie and other trailblazing artists at The Other Art Fair’s Online Studios.

Introducing The Other Art Fair Online Studios, a new online platform offering art lovers around the world access to over 800 Fair artists. The Online Studios will keep our community feeling inspired, engaged, and continue to spread joy through art.

Original source: https://canvas.saatchiart.com/the-other-art-fair/meet-the-others-jaime-gray

STIK in Central London, England

A new installation by artist STIK has been unveiled in Central London. The digital artwork revolves around the historical Piccadilly Lights, the largest public screen in Europe and depicts a group of young people holding hands as a symbol of hope and solidarity both locally and internationally during the Coronavirus Lockdown.

The artwork was created by STIK for Young Westminster Foundation as a campaign to raise funds for foundation’s work with the young people in the local community.

STIK  is known for some of the largest public murals in London, New York and Tokyo and is one of the handful of street artists to have made the leap into the international fine art establishment. His simple stick figures wordlessly tell the story of his community and he frequently collaborates with hospitals, charities and homeless organisations.

Check out below for more photos of the installation.

 

The post STIK in Central London, England appeared first on StreetArtNews.

Original source: https://streetartnews.net/2020/05/stik-in-central-london-england.html

will cotton

Oh my word, YES. I’ve been watching the “in progress” images show up on his Instagram feed for months, and finally, New York based painter Will Cotton‘s cowboys ‘n unicorns are ready to ride! His brand new show, titled “The Taming of the Cowboy”, opens this Thursday May 28th at Galerie Templon in Brussels, and runs until July 31, 2020. Here is the statement from the gallery’s press release:

“In a nod to his country’s political schizophrenia in the midst of the electoral campaign, Will Cotton offers a new take on the myth of the cowboy, symbolizing the conquest of the West. His large, ostensibly classical oil paintings portray a surprising encounter between triumphant cowboys and their fantastical steeds: pink unicorns. The figure of the cowboy evokes a strong sense of American masculinity, associated with freedom, manifest destiny and a culture of violence. In contrast, the unicorn — particularly when pink — reminds us of a more contemporary mythology that has in recent years taken possession of the little girls’ section of toy and clothing departments everywhere. Questioning the notion of gender, the exhibition explores the relationship between the sexes along with the hypersexualization of childhood, the notion of queer, and the LGBT movement, whose global mascot has recently become the rainbow unicorn.”

Okay, I didn’t think it was possible, but now I love these oil paintings even more. 

Original source: https://www.thejealouscurator.com/blog/2020/05/27/will-cotton-3/